MennoMedia Receives $8,100 from Everence’s Rebate for Missions Program

Guest Post by Anna Groff

The Mennonite, Inc., and MennoMedia received the highest vote totals in Everence’s Rebate for Missions program.

RebateForMission

Each organization will receive $8,100 from Everence Federal Credit Union.

In April, The Mennonite, Inc., was nominated as a global grant recipient for Everence’s 2014 Rebate for Missions™ funds by the Everence executive team. Online voting by fans took place during the month of May.

The other global nominees, in addition to The Mennonite, Inc., and MennoMedia, included: Church of the Brethren, Friends General Conference and Rosedale Mennonite Missions.

Each year, Everence Federal Credit Union tithes to church and mission work 10 percent of its interchange income from the use of its Visa credit cards. In addition to the amount awarded to the global organizations, a portion is donated to local community charities through branch offices.

Since the Rebate for Missions program began in 1995, Everence Federal Credit Union has given nearly $400,000 in grants.

MennoMedia, an agency of Mennonite Church USA and Mennonite Church Canada, seeks to engage and shape church and society with resources for living Christian faith from an Anabaptist perspective.

Thanks to everyone who voted.

By Anna Groff, currently executive director of The Mennonite, Inc., will begin as executive director of Dove’s Nest later this summer.

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To contribute to the work of MennoMedia, your online donations accepted here. 

 

Ah summer … ah books

MelissaMillerPorchSwingEdited

By Melissa Miller, secretary of MennoMedia board

Musician Frank Zappa lamented, “So many books, so little time!” For some of us, summer slows down enough that we can indulge in our love of reading, nearly to our heart’s content. I am one of the fortunate few who finds enough time for books during the warm months of the year, and even more fortunately, a professional obligation to read.

Herald Press often fills the bill. This summer that has included the lighter, yet still meaningful fare from the Plainspoken series, Called to be Amish: From Head Majorette to the Old Order (by Marlene C. Miller) & Chasing the Amish Dream: My Life as a Young Amish Bachelor (by Loren Beachy)

CalledToBeAmish ChasingTheAmishDream

I’ve enjoyed these up close reflections from writers who speak out of their personal experiences. I’ve had little contact with Amish over the years, except through visits with my in-laws in the Amish-saturated Kishacoquillas Valley of Pennsylvania (where there are actually four separate tribes of Amish among the 13,000 inhabitants).

For denser material, and to aid in sermon preparation, I am working my through the Believers’ Church Biblical Commentary on John by Willard Swartley. I am grateful for the work that Swartley and other scholars do on our behalf, bringing the riches of their research and knowledge to us that we may deepen our understanding and appreciation for the treasures of the Bible.

BCBC JohnJohn has been one of those books I have puzzled over with its complex, intertwined themes. As one professor said, “John is like a bowl of spaghetti. You try to pick out one noodle (one theme) in a passage, and the whole mess comes out with it.” Swartley’s diligent, loving exegesis enables me to identify the different themes in “the pasta bowl”. It also leads me to appreciate the biblical author’s extraordinary skill and passionate call to faith in Jesus.

Last fall, when I jumped into teaching Sunday School with our church’s young children, I was delighted with the still-new Shine curriculum. In the busy-ness of life, I had just a few moments to skim the teacher’s manual, Shine Together: The Essential Guide for Leaders and Teachers.

ShineTogetherWhat I encountered there warmed my heart and brought tears to my eyes, like these words from the introduction, “Let children’s imagination, sense of mystery, creativity, and boldness inspire Christ’s church today…Children’s spiritual wisdom can be found in the midst of exuberant play, settling arguments, work, mealtimes, and conversation. The child’s spiritual learning environment is everywhere, anytime. Where the child is, God is already there.” (p 9)

With the slower pace of summer, I look forward to savoring the manual’s nuggets mined from the writers’ deep faith and insight.

May your summer include gems such as these. And thanks to MennoMedia for continuing to provide them!

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To purchase any of the above books or other resources, check the store. (Although currently closed through June 30 for inventory. Sorry. But sign up here to receive timely email news and specials from MennoMedia and Herald Press)

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What is on your reading list for this summer? Anything from Herald Press or MennoMedia? We’d love to hear and may feature your comments in a follow up post or on Facebook. 

MelissaMillerPorchSwingCroppedMelissa Miller fulfills some of her love of summer reading while seated on a swing (ted by her husband from Pennsylvania oak) at her Winnipeg, Manitoba home. She is a Canadian member, and secretary of, the MennoMedia board.

John D. Roth’s Teaching that Transforms increases reach through Spanish translation

 

Ensenanza(Abajo puede hallarse la versión de este artículo en español.)

News release
June 24, 2015

Book advocating Mennonite education now available in Spanish

MENNOMEDIA AND MENNONITE EDUCATION AGENCY, GOSHEN, Ind., HARRISONBURG, Va. and KITCHENER, Ontario—John D. Roth takes on long-debated questions about private and Christian education in his book Teaching that Transforms, first published in 2011. The new Spanish translation of the book, Enseñanza que transforma, was released on May 15.

Herald Press teamed up with Mennonite Schools Council (MSC) via Mennonite Education Agency to create the Spanish translation edition, with Christina Horst serving as the bilingual translator for the project.

In Teaching that Transforms, Roth provides support for private Christian schools through careful argumentation. Specifically focusing on the unique perspective of Anabaptist-Mennonite education, he outlines a pedagogy that promotes healthy relationships, helps to form habits of worship, and focuses on God’s presence in the world.

When asked about the book’s premise, Roth said, “My central argument is that there has been a paradigm shift in almost every level of Mennonite education. Mennonites started their own schools to protect youth from the influences of the world; today schools exist to engage the world.”

Though Roth recognizes some of the obstacles standing in the way of his vision for education, including cost and location of Anabaptist-Mennonite schools, he highlights the transformative possibilities of this style of education, for individuals as well as the church.

In addition to editing the Mennonite Quarterly Review and serving as director of the Mennonite Historical Library, Roth teaches history at Goshen College in Goshen, Indiana. The author of numerous other works centered on Anabaptist theology and history, Roth received his master’s and PhD from the University of Chicago.

Nelson Kraybill, lead pastor at Prairie Street Mennonite Church and president emeritus of Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary, says of the book: “With the passion of a parent and the heart of a churchman, Roth builds a compelling case for Anabaptist-Mennonite education. Neither smug nor apologetic, he shows how deep roots in this stream of church renewal will bear fruit for the gospel as our children learn to witness and serve in the world.”

Ervin Stutzman, executive director of Mennonite Church USA and author of the historical novel series Return to Northkill, says, “This book is infused with life and energy from Roth’s conviction that Mennonite schools ‘will be shaped by a Christ-centered way of reading Scripture, a Christ-centered understanding of relationships with other people, and a Christ-centered view of the church as the visible form of the resurrected Jesus in the world today.’”

Teaching that Transforms and the Spanish edition titled Enseñanza que transforma are available for $12.99 USD each from MennoMedia at 800-245-7894 or www.MennoMedia.org, as well as at bookstores.

A Spanish translation of this article can be found immediately below.
MennoMedia Staff
High resolution photo available.

For more information

Melodie Davis
News manager
MennoMedia
540-574-4874
MelodieD@MennoMedia.org

Comunicado de prensa

24 de junio del 2015
Libro en defensa de la educación menonita disponible ahora en español

Enseñanza que transforma, de John D. Roth, extiende su alcance al mundo de habla hispana

HERALD PRESS Y AGENCIA MENONITA DE EDUCACIÓN, GOSHEN, Indiana, EnsenanzaHARRISONBURG, Virginia, y KITCHENER, Ontario—En Enseñanza que transforma —un libro publicado primero en inglés en el 2011 bajo el título Teaching that Transforms—, John D. Roth enfrenta preguntas sobre la educación privada y cristiana que han sido debatidas durante mucho tiempo. La traducción al español se publicó el 15 de mayo de este año.

Herald Press se unió al Concilio de Escuelas Menonitas (MSC, por sus siglas en inglés) a través de la Agencia Menonita de Educación para crear la edición en español traducida por Cristina Horst.

En Enseñanza que transforma, Roth brinda apoyo a las escuelas cristianas privadas mediante una meticulosa argumentación. Enfocándose específicamente en la particular perspectiva de la educación anabautista menonita, bosqueja una pedagogía que promueve relaciones saludables, ayuda a formar hábitos de adoración y se enfoca en la presencia de Dios en el mundo.

Al ser consultado sobre la premisa del libro, Roth dijo: “Mi argumento central es que ha habido un cambio de paradigma en casi todos los niveles de la educación menonita. Los menonitas fundaron sus propias escuelas para proteger a los juveniles de las influencias del mundo; hoy las escuelas existen para involucrarse con el mundo”.

Si bien Roth reconoce algunos de los obstáculos que se le presentan a su visión de la educación, incluyendo el costo y la ubicación de las escuelas anabautistas menonitas, destaca las posibilidades transformadoras de este estilo de educación, tanto para individuos como para la iglesia.

Además de editar el Mennonite Quarterly Review y desempeñarse como director de la Biblioteca Histórica Menonita (MHL, por sus siglas en inglés), Roth enseña historia en Goshen College, en esa ciudad de Indiana. Es autor de numerosas obras centradas en la teología y la historia anabautista, y ha hecho su maestría y su doctorado en la Universidad de Chicago.

Nelson Kraybill, pastor principal de la Iglesia Menonita de Prairie Street y presidente emérito del Seminario Bíblico Anabautista Menonita (AMBS), dice acerca del libro: “Con la pasión de un padre y el corazón de un clérigo, Roth construye un argumento convincente para la educación anabautista menonita. Ni engreído ni justificativo, demuestra cómo las raíces profundas en esta línea de renovación de la iglesia darán los frutos del evangelio a medida que nuestros hijos aprendan a dar testimonio y servir en el mundo”.

Ervin Stutzman, director ejecutivo de la Iglesia Menonita de EE. UU. y autor de la serie de novelas históricas de Northkill, dice: “Roth le ha infundido a este libro la vida y la energía que surgen de su convicción de que las escuelas menonitas ‘serán moldeadas por un modo cristocéntrico de leer las Escrituras, una comprensión cristocéntrica de las relaciones con otras personas y una visión cristocéntrica de la iglesia como la forma visible del Jesús resucitado en el mundo actual’”.

Tanto Teaching that Transforms como la edición en español, Enseñanza que transforma, están disponibles en MennoMedia a $12.99 USD cada copia, llamando al 800-245-7894 o a través de www.MennoMedia.org, así como en librerías.

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Arriba puede hallarse la versión de este artículo en inglés.
Comunicado de prensa traducido por Alexander Nuala
Foto en alta resolución disponible.

Para más información

Melodie Davis
Gerente de prensa
MennoMedia
540-574-4874
MelodieD@mennomedia.org