Stephen Estes examines future tech thru lens of ancient faith in Braving the Future

October 31, 2018                                                        News Release

Should the Church embrace or be wary of technology?
Estes examines future tech thru lens of ancient faith in Braving the Future

HARRISONBURG, VA — Technology is changing around us at a blistering pace. We are entering an era in which human bodies merge with devices, corporations know everything about us, and artificial intelligence develops human and even godlike potential. Douglas Estes equips Christians to thoughtfully and prayerfully prepare for a future of rapidly changing technology with Braving the Future: Christian Faith in a World of Limitless Tech (Herald Press, October 2018).

“The future is coming so fast now that we can only imagine what it will bring,” Estes writes. “What happens when technology advances at such a speed that the average person can no longer keep up?” Estes has first-hand experience with this. His father, a former NASA engineer, could not learn how to use a computer with a mouse. “I shudder to think how technologically igno­rant I will be compared to my grandchildren,” Estes says.

In Braving the Future, Estes examines eight key technolo­gies that will shape our future: virtual reality, autonomous machines, gene editing, artificial intelligence, brain-computer interfaces, intelligent robots, nanotechnology and cybernetics.

Drawing on Scripture, Christian tradition, and scientific literature, Estes offers a theology of work, creation, and personhood that is both prophetic and sturdy enough to keep pace with the technology of a future as yet unknown. He helps readers choose trust in God over fearful retreat and following Jesus over uncritical engagement with technology. The future may not look exactly like a science fiction movie, but there will be limitless tech and boundless change.

Rebecca Randall, science editor at Christianity Today says of Braving the Future, “Douglas Estes is a master writer. His work provides valuable cultural analysis on our use of tech, now and into the future. His unique voice at this nexus is not one to ignore.”

Estes is assistant professor of New Testament and practical theology and director of the DMin program at South University—Columbia. Estes has pastored several churches and is the author of many books focusing on the intersection of text, church, and world. Estes’ work has been published in Christianity Today and other venues, and he has received two John Templeton Foundation grants for writing about science, faith, and technology. Connect with him at DouglasEstes.com.

Braving the Future is available from Herald Press for $16.99 (paperback) and $13.99 (ebook) via 800 245 7894 and at the Herald Press webstore, www.HeraldPress.com, Amazon, and other online sources. Canadian customers can order from CommonWord (877 846 1593), Parasource (800 263 2664), and elsewhere.

To schedule an interview with Douglas Estes, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540‑908‑3941 or LeAnnH@mennomedia.org.

 

 

Resources for living out a countercultural faith      

News Release
October 17, 2018

Two new study books ready for congregations
Resources for living out a countercultural faith         

HARRISONBURG, Va.—Two new short study books for Christian education classes and small groups will help Christians looking for guidance on two urgent areas: parenting and prayer.

Herald Press launched the Upside-Down Living series in early 2017 to accompany the release of The Upside-Down Kingdom: Anniversary Edition by Donald B. Kraybill. The eight booklets in the Bible study series engage participants with questions about how to follow Jesus in ways that seem upside down in today’s culture. Each guide includes six sessions.

Upside-Down Living: Parenting authors Katherine and Peter Goerzen tackle the topic of parenting in the way of Christ. In addition to diapers and discipline, raising kids to heed Jesus’ upside-down call away from status and power and toward service and sharing can seem almost impossible. How can Christian parents model countercultural choices? What does success mean in raising your children? The study offers Scriptures and discussion starters geared to parents.

The Goerzens are graduates of Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary and are ordained ministers in Mennonite Church USA. Currently, Katherine is associate pastor at Tabor (Kans.) Mennonite Church, and Peter is Bethel (Kans.) College campus pastor and instructor of Bible and religion.

In the second booklet, Upside-Down Living: Prayer, writer Kelly Chripczuk looks at how to make prayer more than just a hasty sentence or laundry list of the things we want. What does it mean to pray that the kingdom would come here and now as it is in heaven? Prayer can be a time to find out what God wants for us—and for the world.

Chripczuk is associate pastor of Grantham (Pa.) Church and is licensed for ministry in the Brethren in Christ U.S. denomination. She received her MDiv from Princeton Theological Seminary and received training in spiritual direction through Oasis Ministries. Chripczuk offers contemplative retreats and classes at local churches and retreat centers.

The books in the Upside-Down Living series are available for $9.99 USD from Herald Press at 800-245-7894 or online at www.HeraldPress.com (25 percent quantity discount when ordering five or more). Books are also available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other retailers. Canadian customers can order from CommonWord (877-846-1593), Parasource (800-263-2664), and other booksellers.

Pastor and biblical scholar Meghan Larissa Good offers new light on old stories in The Bible Unwrapped

News Release

October 8, 2018

Pastor and biblical scholar Meghan Larissa Good offers new light on old stories in The Bible Unwrapped

HARRISONBURG, Va. — Many people, Christians and non-Christians alike, have questions about the Bible that they are too afraid to ask. In a new book, The Bible Unwrapped: Making Sense of Scripture Today (Herald Press, October 9), Meghan Larissa Good helps readers consider why the Bible matters. The book tackles dozens of difficult questions about passages in the Bible, drawing from the best of contemporary biblical scholarship and the ancient well of Christian tradition. Good is teaching pastor at Trinity Mennonite Church in Glendale, Arizona.

Good has earned a reputation for imaginatively engaging the Bible as a window into God’s wide world. Delving into issues like biblical authority, literary genre, and Christ-centered hermeneutics, Good calls readers beyond both knee-jerk biblicism and skeptical disregard. “The most common question teenagers ask me about religion is, ‘Why should I even care what the Bible has to say?’” writes Good. The Bible Unwrapped serves as her answer. “Between the lines of its obscure laws and strange and unexpected stories, the Bible forms inspired imagination for the God-shaped possibilities of the world,” Good writes. “In it we learn what God’s activity has looked like in the past so that we will recognize it when it is unfolding right in front of us. We discover what God sounds like so that we can hear when God continues to speak.”

Leonard Sweet, bestselling author and scholar, says about The Bible Unwrapped, “Do not let this unique gift pass by unopened and unenjoyed.” Dottie Escobedo-Frank, pastor and author, adds, “You need this book in your church, and in your work with people who are searching for answers. It is the missing piece for our discussions on the Bible.” Gregory A. Boyd, author, theologian, and founding pastor of Woodland Hills Church, is writing a foreword for the book.

Good has degrees from Gordon College, Duke Divinity School, and Portland Seminary. She is a frequent speaker around such topics as biblical hermeneutics, emerging Anabaptism, and the church’s generation gap.

To schedule an interview with Good, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540‑908‑3941 or LeAnnH@mennomedia.org. The Bible Unwrapped is available from Herald Press for $17.99 (paperback) and $13.99 (ebook) via 800 245 7894 and at the Herald Press webstore, www.HeraldPress.com, Amazon, and other online sources. Canadian customers can order from CommonWord (877 846 1593), Parasource (800 263 2664), and elsewhere.