Love Undocumented addresses heated immigration issues in personal way

January 16, 2018

Love Undocumented addresses heated immigration issues in personal way

HARRISONBURG, Va.—Sarah Quezada’s own experiences with immigration, God’s grace, and love bring fresh air to a pressing topic in her debut book, Love Undocumented: Risking Trust in a Fearful World (Herald Press, January 16, 2018).

The United States is home to approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants, a large number of whom have resided in the States for at least a decade. In her touching, personal account, Quezada outlines the profound ways in which her life has been altered by the immigration process, immigrants, and, especially, the undocumented immigrant who became her husband.

With a focus on the way Jesus interacted with strangers, Quezada invites readers to evaluate individuals’ and churches’ role in welcoming immigrants in their communities.

From delightful stories of getting to know her now-husband, Billy, to agonizing reflections on the couple’s uphill struggles with the immigration process, readers will recognize the power of Christ in her narrative and in looking at the highly polarized sides of the immigration debate.

Sarah Quezada was raised in the southern United States; at age 19 she left home to pursue work in justice, service, and racial reconciliation efforts. Her husband, Billy, emigrated from Guatemala, and had an expired visa when the two met and later married. Quezada’s writing has been featured online at Christianity Today, Sojourners, Relevant, ChurchLeaders.com, and numerous other sites.

Shannan Martin, author of Falling Free, says of Love Undocumented, “At a time when division reigns, Sarah Quezada offers an invitation to walk in solidarity and kinship with our immigrant neighbor.” Publishers Weekly calls the book a “probing and personal debut.”

Connect with the author at her website, www.sarahquezada.com. Love Undocumented is available from Herald Press for $15.99 (paperback) and $12.99 (ebook) at 800-245-7894 or at www.HeraldPress.com, Amazon, and other online sources. Canadian customers can order from CommonWord (877-846-1593), Parasource (800-263-2664), and elsewhere.

For more information, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540‑908‑3941 or LeAnnH@mennomedia.org.

—From press release by Karen Campbell Media. High res photos are available.

An Unblinking Look at Midlife

News Release
April 12, 2017

An Unblinking Look at Midlife 

Veteran columnist explores the indignities and perks of midlife in When Did Everybody Else Get So Old?

HARRISONBURG, Va.—The questions of midlife are quieter and deeper than clichés involving motorcycles and illicit affairs suggest. Who have I become? Is this all there is to life? Why does God feel so distant at this
point of my life?
Or, to quote musician Paul Simon, “Why am I soft in the middle? The rest of my life is so hard.”

Author and veteran columnist Jennifer Grant takes an unblinking—and often humorous—look at the transitions of midlife in When Did Everybody Else Get So Old? Indignities, Compromises, and the Unexpected Grace of Midlife (Herald Press, May 2017).

From the emptying nest to the sagging effects of aging, Grant acknowledges the complexities and loss inherent in midlife. As she leads readers through the events of her 40s, stories of loss and crushing identity and faith crises are followed by chapters marked by acceptance and gratitude as she finally gets her footing in midlife.

“I started my forties looking too often into the mirror and getting tangled up in my thoughts—my goals, my shifting identity, my disappointments, my hopes,” Grant says. “As I leave this decade behind, I find myself focusing less on me and more on how I might, bit by incremental bit, help to make the world more whole.”

As Grant addresses issues like hormonal swings and a teenager’s scorn, Grant’s middle-aged readers will recognize themselves in the pages. More than just a memoir, When Did Everybody Else Get So Old? encourages readers to live fully and embrace this stage of life. Author Jon Sweeney calls the book a “necessary, awakening memoir,” and journalist and religion writer Cathleen Falsani writes, “What I didn’t expect was to have my breath taken away, torrents of tears followed—sometimes on the same page—by uncontrollable belly laughs.”

Dorcas Cheng-Tozun, author of Start, Love, Repeat, notes, “This memoir, unexpectedly, helped me look forward to experiencing my forties and fifties.”

Of her own middle years, Grant notes that she and her husband will be empty nesters in four short years. “Our two daughters will be gone, grown, off discovering the people and purposes that will shape their adult lives,” Grant describes. “As much as my heart will strain sometimes, and feel as if it just might tear apart with missing my children, this is all as it should be.”

Jennifer Grant is a writer, editor, and speaker. A former health and family columnist for the Chicago Tribune, she is the author of four previous books, including the adoption memoir Love You More. Her work has also been published at websites such as Aleteia/For Her and on the Sojourner magazine blog God’s Politics. Grant is a longtime member of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, and lives in Wheaton with her husband, four children, and two rescue dogs. Find her online at jennifergrant.com or on Twitter @jennifercgrant.

When Did Everybody Else Get So Old? is $16.99 and available at Amazon and other retailers as well as from Herald Press at 800-245-7894. The book is to be released May 2, 2017.

To schedule an interview with Jennifer Grant, contact LeAnn Hamby at (540) 908‑3941 or LeAnnH@mennomedia.org.

MennoMedia Staff
High-resolution photos available

 

 

Focus on Family to feature Herald Press authors Dave King and Margot Starbuck

Press Release
September 1, 2016

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Co-authors Margot Starbuck and Dave King compare notes on kids and sports at a book signing for Overplayed: A Parent’s Guide to Sanity in the World of Youth Sports at Eastern Mennonite University earlier this year.

Focus on Family to feature Herald Press authors Dave King and Margot Starbuck

Radio program tackling youth sports issues airs September 15 and 16.

HARRISONBURG, Va., and KITCHENER, Ont.—Authors Dave King and Margot Starbuck will debunk myths about youth and over-participation in specialized sports teams on two upcoming programs of the Focus on the Family radio program with Jim Daly and John Fuller.

The programs will air September 15 and 16 on Focus on the Family, a worldwide radio show with an estimated global audience of 220 million.

Overplayed_RGBDuring the back-to-school season when kids are busily getting into sports, King and Starbuck offer guidance for parents from their book, Overplayed: A Parent’s Guide to Sanity in the World of Youth Sports.

King has been the director of athletics at Eastern Mennonite University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, since 2005. He and his wife, Deb, have three grown children and two grandchildren.

Margot Starbuck is a public speaker and author of seven books, including Not Who I Imagined, Permission Granted, and Unsqueezed. She is also a ghostwriter, an editorial adviser, a writing consultant, and a columnist for Today’s Christian Woman. Earlier King and Starbuck wrote about “Four Sports Lessons” in the August/September 2016 issue of Focus on the Family magazine.

Radio listeners who call and give a donation to Focus on the Family when the program airs will receive a free copy of Overplayed. A promo of the interview program appeared live on Facebook on August 15; the video has been viewed over 34,000 times.

Daly is president and CEO of Focus on the Family and Fuller is cohost of the radio program and vice-president of the radio division.

MennoMedia Staff

High-resolution photos available.

For more information from Herald Press:
Melodie Davis
News manager
MennoMedia
540-574-4874
MelodieD@MennoMedia.org