Donald B. Kraybill updates bestselling, award-winning Upside-Down Kingdom

February 6, 2018

 Donald B. Kraybill updates bestselling, award-winning Upside-Down Kingdom

HARRISONBURG, Va.—In Donald B. Kraybill’s The Upside-Down Kingdom, Jesus is slightly irreverent. He critiques the rich, scorches nationalism, redefines Old Testament law, and undercuts the authority of religious leaders.

Kraybill points out that Jesus is into sharing, not hoarding. Service, not status. Community, not competition. Basins, not swords. Loyalty to God, not nation.

Kraybill, a prolific author and sought-after spokesperson on all things Mennonite and Amish, says that people who follow Jesus “embody the life-giving reign of God amid cultures bent on violence, destruction, and death.”

In this anniversary edition of the classic book The Upside-Down Kingdom, released on February 6 by Herald Press, Kraybill calls readers to imagine and embody the reign of God on earth “as it is in heaven.” Since its initial publication in 1978, The Upside-Down Kingdom has become the most-trusted resource on radical Christian discipleship. It won the National Religious Book Award in 1979.

The book has sold more than 100,000 copies and been translated into seven languages. In this edition, the author updated interpretations of parables and added cultural context and connections to current events. Lisa Sharon Harper, author of The Very Good Gospel, has written a new foreword. New discussion questions by D. L. Mayfield and Krispin Mayfield have been added.

Kraybill is internationally recognized for his scholarship on Anabaptist groups. His books, research, and commentary have been featured in national and worldwide media, including the New York Times, Washington Post, The Guardian, NPR, CNN, and NBC. He is distinguished college professor and senior fellow emeritus at the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown College. Kraybill is the author, coauthor, and editor of many books, including Amish Grace and The Riddle of Amish Culture.

“There are many books on Jesus, each with a different spin on his story,” says Kraybill. “In The Upside-Down Kingdom, I have accented the provocative and perplexing upside-downness of the life and teaching of Jesus. My slant reflects my interests as a sociologist and an Anabaptist Christian.”

Staff release
Hi-res photos available

To schedule an interview with Donald Kraybill, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540-908-3941 or

The Upside-Down Kingdom is available from Herald Press for $18.99 (paperback) and $14.99 (ebook) at 800-245-7894 or at, Amazon, and other online sources. Canadian customers can order from CommonWord (877-846-1593), Parasource (800-263-2664), and elsewhere.

New logo for church publisher heralds the new year

January 19, 2018

New logo for church publisher heralds the new year

HARRISONBURG, Va. — Herald Press rolled out a new logo and look in early 2018 to match increased efforts to expand its audience both within and outside the Mennonite church.

The gray, yellow, and white design includes a stylized horn in the logo with a short banner threading through the letter H enclosed in a circle. The horn also appears in the word Herald when Herald Press is spelled out, also in gray and yellow.

“We have worked hard in the last several years to build recognition of the Herald Press brand,” said publisher Amy Gingerich. “As our name becomes recognized in the larger book marketplace, our authors become known for prophetic contributions on cultural topics including peacemaking, identity, or immigration, as well as on Amish and Mennonite thought and life. The new logo lets both authors and customers identify visually that Herald Press books offer a vital impact.”

Magnetry Design, a website design company, was contracted to “create a new store website for Herald Press and design a new logo,” explained Joe Questel, who worked with Magnetry on the new logo and website design. Questel is marketing and sales director for Herald Press and its parent organization, MennoMedia, and says the new Herald Press website is expected to launch later this year.

1940s spine treatment: name only

Herald Press has been publisher for the Mennonite church since 1908 and the name has been used as a brand name for the trade book division since the 1940s. Herald Press first began using a dove logo and the initials HP on the spines of books and elsewhere in 1964 (before that, books were only imprinted with the name Herald Press). In 1997, a logo that consisted only of a stylized dove came into use, and was swapped out in 2004 to incorporate the new Mennonite Church USA and Mennonite Church Canada dove logo.

Varied logos through the years, with new logo far right.







MennoMedia is an agency of Mennonite Church USA and Mennonite Church Canada, and seeks to engage and shape church and society with resources for living Christian faith from an Anabaptist perspective. The head office relocated in late 2017 to downtown Harrisonburg at 100 South Mason Street, with the customer service department remaining in Newton, Kansas, at 800-245-7894.

For more information, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540 908 3941 or


Love Undocumented addresses heated immigration issues in personal way

January 16, 2018

Love Undocumented addresses heated immigration issues in personal way

HARRISONBURG, Va.—Sarah Quezada’s own experiences with immigration, God’s grace, and love bring fresh air to a pressing topic in her debut book, Love Undocumented: Risking Trust in a Fearful World (Herald Press, January 16, 2018).

The United States is home to approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants, a large number of whom have resided in the States for at least a decade. In her touching, personal account, Quezada outlines the profound ways in which her life has been altered by the immigration process, immigrants, and, especially, the undocumented immigrant who became her husband.

With a focus on the way Jesus interacted with strangers, Quezada invites readers to evaluate individuals’ and churches’ role in welcoming immigrants in their communities.

From delightful stories of getting to know her now-husband, Billy, to agonizing reflections on the couple’s uphill struggles with the immigration process, readers will recognize the power of Christ in her narrative and in looking at the highly polarized sides of the immigration debate.

Sarah Quezada was raised in the southern United States; at age 19 she left home to pursue work in justice, service, and racial reconciliation efforts. Her husband, Billy, emigrated from Guatemala, and had an expired visa when the two met and later married. Quezada’s writing has been featured online at Christianity Today, Sojourners, Relevant,, and numerous other sites.

Shannan Martin, author of Falling Free, says of Love Undocumented, “At a time when division reigns, Sarah Quezada offers an invitation to walk in solidarity and kinship with our immigrant neighbor.” Publishers Weekly calls the book a “probing and personal debut.”

Connect with the author at her website, Love Undocumented is available from Herald Press for $15.99 (paperback) and $12.99 (ebook) at 800-245-7894 or at, Amazon, and other online sources. Canadian customers can order from CommonWord (877-846-1593), Parasource (800-263-2664), and elsewhere.

For more information, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540‑908‑3941 or

—From press release by Karen Campbell Media. High res photos are available.