New logo for church publisher heralds the new year

January 19, 2018

New logo for church publisher heralds the new year

HARRISONBURG, Va. — Herald Press rolled out a new logo and look in early 2018 to match increased efforts to expand its audience both within and outside the Mennonite church.

The gray, yellow, and white design includes a stylized horn in the logo with a short banner threading through the letter H enclosed in a circle. The horn also appears in the word Herald when Herald Press is spelled out, also in gray and yellow.

“We have worked hard in the last several years to build recognition of the Herald Press brand,” said publisher Amy Gingerich. “As our name becomes recognized in the larger book marketplace, our authors become known for prophetic contributions on cultural topics including peacemaking, identity, or immigration, as well as on Amish and Mennonite thought and life. The new logo lets both authors and customers identify visually that Herald Press books offer a vital impact.”

Magnetry Design, a website design company, was contracted to “create a new store website for Herald Press and design a new logo,” explained Joe Questel, who worked with Magnetry on the new logo and website design. Questel is marketing and sales director for Herald Press and its parent organization, MennoMedia, and says the new Herald Press website is expected to launch later this year.

1940s spine treatment: name only

Herald Press has been publisher for the Mennonite church since 1908 and the name has been used as a brand name for the trade book division since the 1940s. Herald Press first began using a dove logo and the initials HP on the spines of books and elsewhere in 1964 (before that, books were only imprinted with the name Herald Press). In 1997, a logo that consisted only of a stylized dove came into use, and was swapped out in 2004 to incorporate the new Mennonite Church USA and Mennonite Church Canada dove logo.

Varied logos through the years, with new logo far right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MennoMedia is an agency of Mennonite Church USA and Mennonite Church Canada, and seeks to engage and shape church and society with resources for living Christian faith from an Anabaptist perspective. The head office relocated in late 2017 to downtown Harrisonburg at 100 South Mason Street, with the customer service department remaining in Newton, Kansas, at 800-245-7894.

For more information, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540 908 3941 or LeAnnH@mennomedia.org.

 

Love Undocumented addresses heated immigration issues in personal way

January 16, 2018

Love Undocumented addresses heated immigration issues in personal way

HARRISONBURG, Va.—Sarah Quezada’s own experiences with immigration, God’s grace, and love bring fresh air to a pressing topic in her debut book, Love Undocumented: Risking Trust in a Fearful World (Herald Press, January 16, 2018).

The United States is home to approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants, a large number of whom have resided in the States for at least a decade. In her touching, personal account, Quezada outlines the profound ways in which her life has been altered by the immigration process, immigrants, and, especially, the undocumented immigrant who became her husband.

With a focus on the way Jesus interacted with strangers, Quezada invites readers to evaluate individuals’ and churches’ role in welcoming immigrants in their communities.

From delightful stories of getting to know her now-husband, Billy, to agonizing reflections on the couple’s uphill struggles with the immigration process, readers will recognize the power of Christ in her narrative and in looking at the highly polarized sides of the immigration debate.

Sarah Quezada was raised in the southern United States; at age 19 she left home to pursue work in justice, service, and racial reconciliation efforts. Her husband, Billy, emigrated from Guatemala, and had an expired visa when the two met and later married. Quezada’s writing has been featured online at Christianity Today, Sojourners, Relevant, ChurchLeaders.com, and numerous other sites.

Shannan Martin, author of Falling Free, says of Love Undocumented, “At a time when division reigns, Sarah Quezada offers an invitation to walk in solidarity and kinship with our immigrant neighbor.” Publishers Weekly calls the book a “probing and personal debut.”

Connect with the author at her website, www.sarahquezada.com. Love Undocumented is available from Herald Press for $15.99 (paperback) and $12.99 (ebook) at 800-245-7894 or at www.HeraldPress.com, Amazon, and other online sources. Canadian customers can order from CommonWord (877-846-1593), Parasource (800-263-2664), and elsewhere.

For more information, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540‑908‑3941 or LeAnnH@mennomedia.org.

—From press release by Karen Campbell Media. High res photos are available.

What people wonder about Mennonites: Top 20 questions asked in 2017 at Third Way

News release

December 28, 2017

What people wonder about Mennonites: Top 20 questions asked in 2017 at Third Way

HARRISONBURG, Va.—Suppose your job is to answer impossibly complex questions, sometimes dealing with theology and even eternal destiny. How do you respond?

This was the volunteer task of Erwin and Angela Rempel, now retired mission workers

Angela and Erwin Rempel also volunteer on the annual Everence “Day of Generosity” for MennoMedia.

who served two Mennonite agencies in the U.S. and abroad. They are now “retiring” a second time, this time from answering the myriad questions sent to Third Way website. Third Way is dedicated to conveying information about Mennonites and related Anabaptist groups to the general public.

Since 2012, the Rempels responded personally to questions sent to the website. Third Way was originally launched in 1998 and is curated by staff of MennoMedia as part of its publishing platform on behalf of Mennonite Church USA and Mennonite Church Canada.

Dennis Kuhns and Edith Shenk Kuhns.

Dennis Kuhns, a retired pastor in Harrisonburg, will fill the position vacated by the Rempels as of January 1. He will generally answer questions in keeping with Confession of Faith in a Mennonite Perspective and guide questioners to find answers at Third Way and elsewhere as needed.

A recent story came from Third Way’s outreach:

“I am so happy that I found the courage to visit the Chicago Community Mennonite Church across the street in my neighborhood here on the West Side of Chicago. I first attended the church in the late spring/early summer of 2017. I was a bit apprehensive at first, as I am an African-American and the Mennonite community that I worship with is about 99 percent white. However, after relaxing myself and keeping an open mind, I found it easy to converse with other parishioners and visitors at the church. Pastor Alison and Rev. Celeste immediately welcomed me with open arms and open hearts. They are both to be commended as great women of God. I am STRONGLY considering becoming a member of the church in 2018. Thank you and God bless you.”

Here in no particular order, are 2017’s top 20 questions as determined by staff, asked at Third Way (with minor edits for spelling and grammar) and names withheld.

DRIVE AUTOS? Do Mennonites drive cars?

CHRISTIAN TRUTHS? What are the truths in the Christian faith?

CLOTHING, SMOKING, AND DRIVING. How do Mennonites and Amish differ in their clothing? How come I see some smoking but they cannot drive? Isn’t smoking considered of the world?

WHAT PILLARS? What are a set of rules Mennonites have? Commandments, pillars, moral code?

WWJD? How does Jesus want me to live my life?

UTOPIAN MENNOS? I am doing a research project in school about Utopian Society and I decided to do it on your community. I was wondering if there was anything that you would like to tell me in depth about your community.

FAMILY MEMBER SHUNNING. Why do Amish practice shunning instead of showing Christ’s love for all? Especially when it’s a family member?

DOCTRINES? Is your doctrine the same as the Baptists? Are you Calvinist?

ALDOUS HUXLEY ANYONE? How is your religion similar to the book Brave New World?

KEY TEACHINGS? What are the key teachings of Jesus on the Church?

MULTIPLE PARTNERS? After spending a good amount of time with my Mennonite friend, she has told me that herself and a lot of 25-35-year-old Mennonites don’t marry because it is more fun to have multiple partners, your wealth is yours, plus you are really liberated. It seems things are really changing.

JOIN MENNONITES? We would really like to join the Mennonites. My fiancé and I have been together for six years and will be married. We have both been married before and I know that is looked down on in the community. We have five children and really want to raise them for God. Please let us know if there is anything we can do to be part of the community.

BORN IN SIN? I have often heard at church and from many who call themselves Christians that we are “born in sin” because of Adam and Eve, yet I have never found anything in the Bible that says so. Not a word. What does your church teach about that and what Bible verses support that view?

DID JESUS DIE WILLINGLY? How can we say that Jesus died for our sins? He was persecuted because of our sinful nature. He didn’t suicide. Right? So how can we say that Jesus willingly died on the cross? He says that he was persecuted because he always stood with the right. So how [was] he sacrificed for our sins? What’s the purpose of this belief? What are we expected to believe about Jesus?

A JEANS GUY. Is there a “dress code” for Sunday services? I’m thinking of attending Sunday service at the [name deleted] location, however I don’t really have church clothes. It’s more of shirt and jeans thing in my life at this time.

SABBATH IN TASMANIA? What day is the Sabbath and do you have churches in Tasmania?

SATURDAY WORSHIP? Why don’t you worship on Saturday as indicated in the ten commandments?

STILL HAVE TO GO TO SCHOOL? My friend and I are strong believers in Mennonite living style and way of life. We live by their beliefs already; we are wondering how we fully live the style of a Mennonite? We are 14 and are wondering where we would live and if we would go to school still?

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE? Have Mennonites done research on domestic violence in the U.S.?

DIE AN ATHEIST? If everything happens as according to God’s plan, and I die as an atheist as according to his plan, why do I go to hell?

In addition to much historical and theological information on Mennonites at Third Way, numerous free weekly or monthly email subscriptions are available at thirdway.com/subscriptions: Media Matters, Living Simply, Wider View, Daily Scripture and Stories of Peace. Third Way sponsors include Mennonite Mission Network, Everence, Abundance (Canada), and Goodville Mutual.

The Rempels have written a combined memoir of their lifetime mission work, titled Unexpected Invitations: Surprises, Adventures, and Opportunities in Mennonite Ministry, available here: http://unexpectedinvitations.com/

—Staff release

Melodie Davis, News manager

 

MennoMedia

540-574-4874

melodied@mennomedia.org