MennoMedia moving to downtown Harrisonburg location mid-November 2017

News release
October 17, 2017

MennoMedia moving to downtown Harrisonburg location mid-November 2017

From its current location at 1251 Virginia Avenue, the MennoMedia offices are moving to 100 S. Mason St., Harrisonburg, Virginia in November.

HARRISONBURG, Va.—MennoMedia and its book imprint Herald Press will relocate from a location near Eastern Mennonite University to new rental space in downtown Harrisonburg.

Effective November 1 the new mailing address for MennoMedia and Herald Press is P.O. Box 866, Harrisonburg, VA 22803.

The physical local address (to be used mainly for package delivery) is 100 S. Mason Street, Suite B, Harrisonburg, VA 22801 (note different zip codes).

The actual moving date will be sometime the week of November 6-11, 2017.

MennoMedia formed in 2011 out of the former Mennonite Publishing Network and Third Way Media, and occupied a building at 1251 Virginia Avenue purchased by Mennonite Broadcasts Inc. in 1972. The building has been sold to Eastern Mennonite School (EMS) to be renovated into classroom and office space especially for its elementary school. Groundbreaking for the EMS renovations took place October 12. The new MennoMedia and Herald Press offices in downtown Harrisonburg are in the building of Wharton, Aldhizer, and Weaver PLC.

MennoMedia is an agency of Mennonite Church USA and Mennonite Church Canada, publishing church and Sunday school curricula, hymnals, periodicals, religious trade books under the Herald Press imprint, and the Third Way website.

–Staff release

Melodie Davis
MennoMedia
540-574-4874
melodied@mennomedia.org

 

Podcaster, advocate, and peacemaker Osheta Moore releases debut book, Shalom Sistas

News release
October 5, 2017

Podcaster, advocate, and peacemaker Osheta Moore releases debut book, Shalom Sistas

HARRISONBURG, Va.—In her timely debut book, Shalom Sistas: Living Wholeheartedly in a Brokenhearted World, Osheta Moore sheds light on being a peacemaker in a world of violence, alienation, and injustice. Publishers Weekly, in a starred review, says that “fans of Elizabeth Cunningham, Anne Lamott, and Nadia Bolz-Weber will be delighted with this new, exciting voice.”

When Moore and her husband lost everything to Hurricane Katrina and found themselves relocated to a new city, she made the life-changing decision to become a “seeker of shalom.” Assuming herself to already be a peacemaker, Moore took a bold step and threw herself into her Bible and intensively studied the word peace for 40 days.

Shalom Sistas is the book I wish I had 10 years ago when I stood at our kitchen sink in Boston and realized that the life we lived as urban missionaries in New Orleans was over because of Hurricane Katrina—we lost our occupation as peacemakers to the storm,” says Moore.

There were more adventures ahead. “I certainly didn’t feel like I had the sweet and passive disposition of a peacemaker in our little suburb, so I was left with one big question: If Jesus is my Prince of Peace, what does that mean for me now?” Moore says.

Shalom Sistas is the story of what happened after Moore asked God to help her make peace with peace. “In the book, you’ll see how God used the Hebraic concept of shalom—God’s dream of wholeness for you and for me—to show me I can be a peacemaker right in my everyday life,” says Moore. “You’ll also see how this releases the pressure gauge of ‘not enough,’ which so many of us feel when faced with brokenness in ourselves and in the world.”

Moore takes readers through her Shalom Sista Manifesto, 12 guideposts for living wholeheartedly in a brokenhearted world. The manifesto includes points such as “We are beloved,” “We will rest,” and “We will choose subversive joy.” Readers may race to the end of the book for Moore’s “Shalom Steps,” practical ways people can practice shalom. She also includes a few special recipes in the book, like her famous red beans and rice.

Shannan Martin, author of Falling Free, says, “Shalom Sistas made me want to stand up and cheer! Only Osheta Moore could land these powerful soul truths with such humor and grace.”

Melanie Dale, author of It’s Not Fair and Women Are Scary, writes, “Osheta’s shalom is strong and opinionated; there’s nothing passive or saccharine about it.”

Shalom Sistas includes a foreword by author and blogger Sarah Bessy, and a free online study guide by Abby Perry for small groups, Sunday school, or individual study.

Osheta Moore is a writer and podcaster, as well as wife to an urban pastor, mother of three, and economic justice advocate for women in developing countries. Moore has consistently been a voice for peacemaking, justice, and racial reconciliation. Her work has been featured on numerous websites and blogs, including Sojourners, SheLoves Magazine, A Deeper Story, The Art of Simple, ReKnew, and Rachel Held Evans’s blog. Connect with her at shalominthecity.com.

Shalom Sistas is available from Herald Press for $15.99 (paperback) via 800‑245‑7894, the Herald Press webstore at www.HeraldPress.com, Amazon, and other online sources. Canadian customers can order from CommonWord (877‑846‑1593), Parasource (800‑263‑2664), and elsewhere.

See her video book trailer here describing the Shalom Manifesto.

To schedule an interview with Osheta Moore, contact LeAnn Hamby at 540‑908‑3941 or LeAnnH@mennomedia.org. Media contact: Jeane Wynn, Wynn-Wynn Media, LLC, 918‑283‑1834 or jeane@wynnwynnmedia.com.

 

Growing a spiritual garden with new book: Water My Soul

News release

August 9, 2017

Growing a spiritual garden
90-day devotional puts down roots to the love of Christ and service to others

HARRISONBURG, Va.—How does your spiritual garden grow? What do you do to keep your Christian life flourishing? Darla Weaver explores these ideas as she connects gardening to spiritual growth in a new devotional, Water My Soul: 90 Meditations from an Old Order Mennonite (Herald Press, September 2017).

Touching on themes such as humility, contentment, right living and forgiveness, each meditation includes a daily Scripture reading, prayer, and journal prompt or response idea, designed to motivate and strengthen readers.

“As I worked in my ever-expanding gardens, I was amazed how often God used the natural world to open my eyes to new spiritual truths,” Weaver writes.

As an Old Order Mennonite living in southern Ohio, Weaver spends her time gardening, cooking, caring for her family, and living as much as possible off the land. Weaver bares her heart in these 90 devotionals, all drawn from her home-centered life, and encourages readers to root themselves deeply in Christ’s love, and service to others.

Cindy Woodsmall, New York Times bestselling author of Amish fiction says the book is a “lovely collection of real events that whisk the mind to a beautiful way of life, while the insights resonate with the longings from the deepest part of our hearts.” Mary Ann Kinsinger, coauthor of the Adventures of Lily Lapp book series adds, “These devotionals provide glimpses of the presence of God that is all around us if we only open our eyes and see.”

Women especially will relate to these meditations sprinkled with stories from Weaver’s children, marriage, Old Order Mennonite community and wider friends and family.

Darla Weaver’s first book, Many Lighted Windows, was published in 2016, and she has written for Family Life, Ladies Journal, Young Companion, and other magazines for Amish and Old Order Mennonite groups. Before her three children were born she also taught school. Her hobbies are gardening and writing.

Water My Soul is available for $12.99 USD from MennoMedia at 800-245-7894 or MennoMedia.org; in Canada, the book is $15.75 CAD from CommonWord at 877-846-1593 or commonword.ca; or check bookstores and online.

To schedule a phone interview with Darla Weaver, contact LeAnn Hamby at (540) 908-3941 or LeAnnH@mennomedia.org.